Red Snow (A Tuva Moodyson Mystery Book 2) by Will Dean @willrdean @OneworldNews #RedSnow #NewRelease #NetGalley

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BOOK DESCRIPTION

Red Snow is the eagerly awaited follow-up to Dark Pines, selected for ITV’s Zoe Ball Book Club

TWO BODIES

One suicide. One cold-blooded murder. Are they connected? And who’s really pulling the strings in the small Swedish town of Gavrik?

TWO COINS

Black Grimberg liquorice coins cover the murdered man’s eyes. The hashtag #Ferryman starts to trend as local people stock up on ammunition.

TWO WEEKS

Tuva Moodyson, deaf reporter at the local paper, has a fortnight to investigate the deaths before she starts her new job in the south. A blizzard moves in. Residents, already terrified, feel increasingly cut-off. Tuva must go deep inside the Grimberg factory to stop the killer before she leaves town for good. But who’s to say the Ferryman will let her go?

BOOK LINK:

Red Snow (A Tuva Moodyson Mystery Book 2)

HERE ARE MY THOUGHTS AND REVIEW

I have to say that this book gave me a real look at living off the beaten track in a small town in Sweden, where there is no postcard images to attract visitors. It is a working town with Liquorice production the main source of income for the residents of Gavrik. The winter is harsher than normal, the people are cold and suffering from dry skin that has to be constantly moisturised to stop it getting sore and cracked. This is the reality of every day life for most of the residents. It certainly pushed images of skiing down mountains to the back of my mind. When the owner of the factory takes a dive off one of the chimneys, a local news reporter Tuva Moodyson was there to see it happen.

I liked the idea of the investigation being seen from a different angle than that of a detective. The death of the owner was hushed by the authorities and turned into an accident. This was of course like a carrot offered to a donkey, Tuva just had to dig deeper.  Tuva has her own problems which she has learnt to live with, although at times it is a hinderance. Tuva is very deaf but with the help of hearing aids she copes. Her disability is constantly referred to in the story and the everyday problems that come from it.

The suicide had been brushed away but when murder takes place then it starts to get real for everyone. The employees are edgy but keeping schtum. When Tuva is approached with a proposition it opens previously closed doors for her and a world previously closed to outsiders.

The owners of the factory are very private people who look after all their workers and the workers are very loyal to the family. Tuva finds a way in which she can infiltrate the family to really get the know these recluses. I loved this part of the story the most. It was fascinating getting to know the different generations of women that lived above the factory in their private rooms.

It was like taking a step back in time once I was in the private rooms of the Grimbergs, they were living in a cocoon. It was weird because I felt protective of these women that seemed imprisoned in their own little worlds.

This was my first Will Dean book and I shall have to read the first to see how it compares. I like Tuva, she was a down to earth and determined lady that I grew to admire.

 

HERE IS A LITTLE ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Will Dean grew up in the East Midlands, living in nine different villages before the age of eighteen. He was a bookish, daydreaming kid who found comfort in stories and nature (and he still does). After studying Law at the LSE, and working in London, he settled in rural Sweden. He built a wooden house in a boggy clearing at the centre of a vast elk forest, and it’s from this base that he compulsively reads and writes. He is the author of Dark Pines.

AUTHOR LINKS:

Twitter: @willrdean

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11 thoughts on “Red Snow (A Tuva Moodyson Mystery Book 2) by Will Dean @willrdean @OneworldNews #RedSnow #NewRelease #NetGalley

  1. I’ve just read this too and loved it. Like you, I really enjoyed the picture it gave of life in a small town in such a harsh climate. I felt the ending was a little bit rushed, as if the author had suddenly realised the book was getting big and could wind up being too cumbersome, but not enough to detract from my enjoyment, and I’ll definitely be seeking out the previous book in the series.

    Liked by 1 person

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